How Tight is the Job Market for Black 2Ls?

From the Social Security Office:  During the Great Depression preceding the passage of the Social Security Act soup kitchens provided the only meals some unemployed Americans had. This particular soup kitchen was sponsored by the Chicago gangster Al Capone.

From the Social Security Office: During the Great Depression preceding the passage of the Social Security Act soup kitchens provided the only meals some unemployed Americans had. This particular soup kitchen was sponsored by the Chicago gangster Al Capone.

Firm layoffs are being reported daily, and while we have no way of knowing whether black associates are being laid off disproportionately, we are worried that this might be the case.  We haven’t focused much on the impact this might be having on current law students, but we were recently alerted to this UVA Law School letter to the editor.  The authors claim to be three jobless 2L’s (two in the top third of the class and one on Law Review).  If folks in the top half of a solid top 10 school are hurting, we’ve got to wonder how tight it is on everyone else:

…many 2Ls, having completed the process, are still struggling to find jobs for the summer, and have to start over at a time when most law firm employers have already filled their summer slots.

After criticizing the newspaper’s one-sided interview coverage, the authors go on to add:

Together, the three authors of this letter had about 60 OGIs, nearly 20 callbacks, and zero offers. Two are in the top third of the class; the other is on Law Review. We are not alone. The purpose of this is not to spread panic or sow fear, but to present a more balanced picture of the OGI process, especially now, in a time of economic downturn and uncertainty.

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